Principal Investigator

Sridevi V. Sarma
Principal Investigator

Dr. Sridevi Sarma received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Cornell University, Ithaca NY, in 1994; and an M.S.  and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in, Cambridge MA, in 1997 and 2006, respectively. From 2000-2003 she took a leave of absence to start a data analytics company. From 2006--2009, she was a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge.  She is now an associate professor in the Institute for Computational Medicine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore MD. Her research interests include modeling, estimation and control of neural systems using electrical stimulation. She is a recipient of the GE faculty for the future scholarship, a National Science Foundation graduate research fellow, a L’Oréal For Women in Science fellow, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Careers at the Scientific Interface Award, the Krishna Kumar New Investigator Award from the North American Neuromodulation Society, and a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) and the Whiting School of Engineering Robert B. Pond Excellence in Teaching Award.

EmailWebsiteGoogle Scholar

Research Scientists

Kristin Maria Gunnarsdottir
Assistant Research Scientist

Kristin Gunnarsdottir received her B.S. degree in Biomedical Engineering from Reykjavik University, Iceland, in 2013, and her M.S.E and PhD degrees in Biomedical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, in 2016 and 2021. She is now a Research Scientist in the Neuromedical Control Systems Lab. Her M.S.E. research focused on designing more reliable, effective and objective sleep stage scoring and diagnostic methods for sleep disorders. For her Ph.D., Kristin applied control theoretic techniques to study epilepsy. Her work involves developing a tool that provides a denser brain coverage by estimating neural activity at clinically determined “missing electrode” locations from measured signals in patients undergoing invasive monitoring.

 
 
EmailLinkedIn
Patrick Myers
Assistant Research Scientist
Email

Postdocs

Christine Elizabeth Beauchene
Postdoc

Christine Beauchene received her B.S. and Ph.D degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, in 2012 and 2018 respectively. Her doctoral research was focused primarily on augmenting working memory maintenance by using a non-invasive brain stimulation technique called binaural beats which were controlled using an EEG-based closed loop controller. She is currently a NIH T32 Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Biobehavioral Pain Research Training Grant at Johns Hopkins University. Her research interests include closed-loop control of neural systems, neural networks, modeling, and chronic pain.

 

Email
Daniel Dorman
Postdoc

Daniel Dorman received his B.S. in biomedical engineering from LeTourneau University in Longview, Texas, and his PhD in neuroscience from George Mason University. His doctoral dissertation focused on developing biophysically detailed computational models of individual neurons of the striatum to investigate mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. He joined the Neuromedical Control Systems Lab as a postdoc in 2021 as an IRACDA postdoctoral fellow in Johns Hopkins University's ASPIRE program. In the NCSL his research focuses on models of decision making and analysis of EEG data collected during decision making experiments to identify brain networks that support decision making and executive function.

Email
Patrick Greene
Postdoc

Patrick Greene is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Institute for Computational Medicine at Johns Hopkins. He received his B.S. in Mathematics from University of Chicago and his Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from University of Arizona. His doctoral research was in neural signal processing, where he worked on incorporating biophysical properties of the brain into a Bayesian statistical framework in order to improve discriminability between signals from different neurons. He is currently working on projects involving the relationship between neuropathic pain and sleep, as well as on the neural correlates of decision making.

Email
Rachel June Smith
Postdoc

Rachel June Smith is a postdoctoral fellow in the Biomedical Engineering department. She received her B.S. from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and her M.S. and Ph.D. from University of California, Irvine, all in Biomedical Engineering. Her work has focused in biomedical signal processing, first as an undergraduate in ECG signals processing, later in arterial blood pressure waveform processing through an internship at Edwards Lifesciences, and her doctoral work focused on EEG signals processing to predict treatment outcome in pediatric epilepsy patients. She is currently building dynamical models of cortical stimulation to guide clinical delineation of the seizure onset zone in adult epilepsy patients. Rachel is an NIH-funded IRACDA fellow through ASPIRE at Johns Hopkins, a program that prepares biomedical scientists and engineers to pursue careers in academia through training in research, teaching, and mentorship of students typically underrepresented in STEM fields. 

Email
Daniel Ehrens
Postdoc

Graduate Students

Tony Wei
PhD Candidate

Tony Wei received his B.S. in Biomedical Engineering and B.S. in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from the Johns Hopkins University. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Biomedical Engineering in Dr. Sridevi Sarma’s Neuromedical Control Systems Lab at the Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include neural signal processing, machine learning applications in neuroscience, and chronic pain. For his Ph.D., he is collaborating with Dr. Latremoliere and Dr. Alexandre from the Neurosurgery Pain Research Institute at Johns Hopkins to identify an EEG neuropathic pain biomarker from mice fronto-parietal brain activity during sleep.

Email
Claire Zurn
PhD Candidate

Claire Zurn is a Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. Candidate at Johns Hopkins University. She received her Bachelor of Biomedical Engineering from the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities in 2019. Her research interests are electrical neuromodulation therapies and their optimization through modeling. Claire’s current work is in the development of a closed-loop stimulation approach for chronic pain treatment in a rat model. Claire is passionate about diversity and inclusion initiatives, and co-founded the department’s PhD Student Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Committee. When she’s not working, Claire can be found playing with her dog, watching movies, and baking sweets.

Email

Research Staff

Christopher Taylor
Research Staff
Email

Undergraduate Students

Sophia Zhai
Undergraduate
Sayantika Roy
Undergraduate

Alumni

Photo gallery